Month: November, 2017

30 Nov

NYHC & NHC 44th Annual Awards Program

Bright Power Uncategorized

Congratulations to This Year’s Honorees and Nominees

Omni Morris Ave Solar

We’re elated client and partner of Bright Power, OMNI New York LLC is being honored as Developer of the Year at this year’s NYHC & NHC Awards Program. OMNI New York has been a fantastic partner we’ve worked with on projects such as Morris Avenue (pictured above), Archer Green, and 10 Richman Plaza.

We are also incredibly proud that Bright Power has been involved in so many impactful affordable housing projects. We wish all of our clients and partners nominated for the Community Impact Competition the best of luck.

Settlement Housing Fund / The Briarwood Organization & Edelman Sultan Knox Wood / Architects LLP – 1561 Walton Avenue: We provided new construction services including Enterprise Green Communities certification and NYSERDA Multifamily Performance Program (MPP) Partner Services.

Unique People Services & MAP – 2050 Grand Concourse: We are working as the energy efficiency and green building consultant for this supportive housing new construction project.  As part of our services, we are helping the development team target a LEED Platinum certification and design on-site energy generation systems that will be able to power critical loads in the event of a disruption to the electric grid.

The Bridge, Inc. & the Leviticus Fund – 3500 Park Avenue: We are currently working as the project’s solar design consultant, continuing the solar design and installation services we have provided for The Bridge on other projects including 918 East New York Avenue, which is currently under construction.

Radson Development & MAP – Creston Parkview: We are providing Enterprise Green Communities certification and commissioning services.

HELP USA with SAGE USA & Magnusson Architecture and Planning (MAP) – HELP Crotona Senior Housing: We consulted with HELP USA starting with their tax credit funding application and are providing energy efficiency, green building, and mechanical system commissioning services including NYSERDA New Construction Program and Enterprise Green Communities consulting.  We designed and will install a 90.72 kW solar PV array atop a trellis-pergola steel framing system.

BFC Partners, Marvel Architects, SAGE USA – Ingersoll Senior Residences with SAGE USA: We consulted with the development team as part of their successful response to a NYCHA RFP.  We are providing energy efficiency, green building and mechanical system commissioning services, including NYSERDA New Construction Program and Enterprise Green Communities consulting.

MDG Design + Construction, LLC – Michelangelo Apartments: We served as the project’s energy efficiency consultant, beginning with an energy audit to identify cost-effective energy and water efficiency measures.  The energy scope for the project includes converting from electric baseboard to hydronic heating which will produce significant energy and cost-savings.  We are providing the services to procure incentives from the NYSERDA MPP, commission the new hydronic boiler plants, and set up monitoring equipment that will allow us to track the performance of critical building systems in real time through our MoBIUS offering. 

RDC Development (MDG Design + Construction, LLC and Wavecrest Management) – Ocean Bay Apartments: We served as the project’s energy efficiency, power resiliency and on-site generation consultant, conducted an energy audit of the 24 building property, and provided an on-site generation feasibility study to assess the viability of solar PV, co-generation and energy storage technologies.  After determining that solar PV was the most cost-effective on-site generation technology, we designed a system that will significantly reduce the property’s electric costs.  We are now installing the 575.52 kW solar system, the third largest system on an affordable multifamily property in New York State.   Read more about our work here.

Monadnock Development & Bernheimer Architecture – One Flushing: We consulted on and are in the process of installing a 116.1 kW solar PV system.

Georgica Green Ventures, Stephen B. Jacobs Group PC, Glenwood Management & Concern for Independent Living – Surf Vets Place: We work as the energy efficiency and green building consultant for this new construction project.  As part of our services, we help the project meet the guidelines of Enterprise Green Communities as well as commission its mechanical systems.

Women’s Housing and Economic Development Corporation (WHEDco), Edelman Sultan Knox Wood / Architects LLP, Peter Franzese  – Urban Horizons (UH): We conducted the energy auditing portion of NYC HPD’s first Green Physical Needs Assessment (GPNA).

We think all of the nominees are winners for their dedication and commitment to positively influencing each community they touch!

29 Nov

Bright Employee: Gregory Sherman

Bright Power Bright Employee, Business, California

We’re proud of the intelligent, passionate, and hardworking people that make up the Bright Power team. Each month, you’ll get a chance to meet one of them, understand how they contribute to the organization, and what makes them excited to come to work every day.

Meet Gregory Sherman, Vice President, Business Development, who launched our Oakland office.

What do you like most about working at Bright Power?
Collaborating with incredibly intelligent and passionate people! I really like working for a company that has a clear vision. Bright Power’s mission is an important one, it is what gets me up in the morning. I value our role as a company that is more than a consultancy – we have positioned ourselves where the rubber meets the road, and that is what is needed to improve the energy and water performance of the built environment. We are having a real impact. I have been with Bright Power for over a decade, and it has been quite a ride! Watching the company grow from a few of us working out of a closet-sized office to a market leader 100+ strong has been deeply gratifying. Knowing that our impact is growing every year is one of the most satisfying aspects of working at Bright Power.

What are some projects and accomplishments you’re most proud of?
I am most proud of our early success here in California. It was difficult to trade in the comfort and safety of my position in New York for a business development role in a new place where no one knew the Bright Power name. But thanks to our unique Find, Fix, Follow approach and our successful track record on the East Coast, prospective clients were willing to take a chance on us. It is a great feeling to present our value proposition to a prospective client and get them bought in. Working with clients and friends at organizations such as LivCor, MG Properties Group, AIG, Fairfield Residential, Bridge Property Management, J.P. Morgan Asset Management, Equity Residential, Related, LeFrak, Kaled Management Corp., Goldman Group, Fisher Organization, and Sares Regis have made this journey well worth it.

What’s the one service offering we have that you think is the most beneficial to clients?
Our most valuable service is that we provide many services under one roof. Our integrated Find, Fix, Follow approach to energy and water management is our competitive advantage and differentiator. Once we establish trust, this approach becomes the way our clients manage energy and water.

What’s something people might not know about you and your role at Bright Power?
Something I did not know about myself is that I enjoy the thrill inherent in business development. It is a good feeling to present our value proposition to a prospective client and get them bought in. 

28 Nov

Engaging Residents in Energy Efficiency: Park Terrace Gardens’ Green Committee

Betsy Harbison aerators, efficiency, energy management, tenants Tags:

Park Terrace Gardens

Want to reduce your energy and water costs in your cooperative or condominium?  Tired of ongoing energy and water issues clogging up your email inbox and board meetings? Or are you just not sure where to begin?

A few years ago, Park Terrace Gardens in Upper Manhattan decided to form committees that focused on specific issues. This sparked the creation of their Green Committee lead by four passionate women – Osi Kaminer, Kim Schwab, Bev Solow, and Leslie Zema.

What Does a Green Committee Do?

It’s a group of residents that…

  • Serve as a resource and contact for the board, shareholders, property manager, and super to address residents’ energy efficiency and sustainability needs.  
  • Understand the building’s energy needs.
  • Research and enlist energy and water management experts, like Bright Power.
  • Assess savings opportunities and the best next steps in collaboration with experts, building staff, and board members.
  • Collaborate with the coop management, elect to move forward with a plan of action, implement savings measures, and keep the board up-to-date throughout the installation.
  • Review project success and savings with the board and shareholders once the project is complete, including a way to ensure ongoing savings year after year.
  • Continually learn from other buildings’ energy initiatives.

Green Committee Goal: Keep residents comfortable while keeping energy costs down.

Park Terrace Gardens Green Committee at Work

Through completing their own utility benchmarking, Park Terrace Gardens became aware of the building’s needs to reduce inefficiencies. Needing to comply with local energy auditing laws, the board, by recommendation of the Green Committee, brought on Bright Power to complete a comprehensive energy audit that dug deeper into the property’s opportunities to find sustainable savings. The energy audit report helped elucidate and pinpoint long-term issues and allowed the board cost-effective options to implement energy and water savings measures. The Green Committee was critical to the success of this project and overall process, coordinating with the energy experts while collaborating with the board and shareholders to ensure smooth sailing. As a result, the measures below were completed at the property and the savings are monitored using EnergyScoreCards.

Upgraded boiler and balanced the steam distribution system

The Green Committee counted over 80 windows that were left open during heating season! Since the upgrade, the Green Committee used portable temperature sensors to educate residents on the changes they can make in their unit to get the most out of the retrofit, like moving furniture or heavy curtains away from radiators.

Weatherstripped exterior doors and in-unit AC systems

To tackle this effort and get the return on their investment, the Green Committee created gift bags for each resident complete with weatherstripping designed for windows with A/C units, detailed installation instructions, and handwritten personalized notes to each resident.  The committee saw huge success with this campaign and are sure the personalized touch made all the difference. This measure has greatly reduced the amount of air infiltration coming into the building, minimizing the amount of energy wasted in both heating and cooling seasons.

Installed LED lighting

The board sponsored a giveaway of 5 LED bulbs for each unit in an effort to attract shareholders and reduce energy costs. The Green Committee set up the building’s conference room with different types of LED bulbs to demonstrate to the tenants that LED lights can have the same – or often times better – lighting output as other energy-intensive bulbs.  Through education and live demonstration, the committee changed the opinions of shareholders. In tandem with a common area lighting retrofit, the building saw the lighting retrofit reduced 15% in electricity cost reductions in the first year!

Installed faucet aerators

The Green Committee shared with the building shareholders how and why they were making the change – using the audit report as a crutch to validate the investment opportunity (payback was under 6 months!). Supplemented with informational flyers and thank you notes, the committee was able to make a big impact.

Advice From Park Terrace Gardens on Starting Your Green Committee

1.  Regularly educate and communicate with board members and residents.
Committee member, Osi Kaminer, says that their commitment to consistently educating the board is the key to their success.  She also says that having a committee member serve as a board member to liaise between the two groups is crucial.  This ensures the committee gets in front of the board regularly and can continue to push forward the Green Committee’s agenda outside of meetings.

Osi attributes their success with residents to the constant communication and open access to committee members. The committee created a group email for shareholders that would forward to the Green Committee and the property manager.  They also publicized their phone numbers and welcomed regular contact.  This personal communication reminded the other shareholders that the committee members were residents themselves, making shareholders more receptive to the Green Committee’s suggestions.

2.  Don’t shy away from shareholders who complain.
Osi is clear: the committee’s goal is to ensure everyone is as comfortable as possible.  While they know they may not be able to make everyone happy, they can make everyone comfortable.  

Investigating a shareholder’s complaints about a cold unit sparked a visit where the committee learned that a previous tenant had removed a radiator from the unit.  And, in discussing this with the shareholder, the committee learned that there were other units facing the same issues.  If they had simply said “the boiler is set above the temperature required by law” and moved on, they would never have learned about the missing radiators in multiple units.  

3.  Understand the Board’s Goals.
Have the committee start with a list, provided by the board, of items they may want to explore and address. Let the committee investigate and share back their findings with the board.  Keeping your goals aligned will be a constant reminder – you are both on the same side with the same goal.

4.  Look to Others’ Success.
This Green Committee attended many workshops and connected with other buildings that completed or were undergoing similar projects.  By learning from those who already have gone through the process, the Park Terrace Gardens Green Committee knew about potential roadblocks before they hit them.  And, they were able to show what a project might look like on the other side, exciting the board and shareholders.

Read more detailed information about the steam system upgrades in this Building Energy Exchange case study

See the survey the Green Committee used to help our engineers understand residents’ behavior when it comes to heating and cooling their apartment here.

See an example of a flyer the Green Committee posted thanking residents for their participation in NYSERDA’s Energy Reduction Plan here.

How might you recommend a Green Committee for your coop or condo? Share your story with us on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, or email us at info@brightpower.com!

 

16 Nov

State of Multifamily Energy and Water Benchmarking 2017

Jon Braman benchmarking, energy management

Energy and water benchmarking is a simple concept that can mean very different things to different people. For some, the phrase conjures a burdensome and impractical requirement – especially the collection of resident utility data where providers don’t make it easy. For others, benchmarking seems like an almost magical catalyst that can unleash a future of high performance, low-carbon buildings. The reality includes both. But whatever your perspective, it’s safe to say that in the last decade benchmarking has gone from “cutting edge” to a mainstream practice of the multifamily real estate world. Still, we’re just getting started.

Launching EnergyScoreCards platform in 2009, Bright Power has been a leader in multifamily benchmarking for some time, continuing to work with visionary real estate companies, publish research and share best practices ever since. In this post, I draw on that experience to shed light on this rapidly evolving real estate practice and answer common questions.

Who is Benchmarking?

By summer 2017, 18 cities and one state now require multifamily buildings over a certain size to benchmark, and sometimes publicly disclose energy and often water consumption (Source: http://www.buildingrating.org). That’s big, and between California’s requirement taking effect next year, the expansion of the NYC law to include buildings 25k – 50k SF and HUD’s new benchmarking rule in development, the number of properties benchmarking annually is set to increase dramatically in the next year. To give a sense of scale, in terms of square footage and CO2 emissions, covered multifamily buildings in NYC alone represent 1.5 Billion square feet and 7.5 million megatons emitted annually CO2. In Chicago it’s 260 million square feet, emitting 1.9 million megatons of CO2, Seattle has 100 million square feet of benchmarking multifamily buildings, Boston 66 million, Philly 5.4 million square feet – and the list goes on.

These numbers, understate the total multifamily properties that benchmark their energy and water consumption, since many do it voluntarily – including the 112 of the 345 partner organizations (that is portfolios, not buildings) that have signed up for the Better Buildings Challenge, or a number of 250 members of the Global ESG Benchmark for Real Estate (GRESB), an investor-led sustainability reporting framework, which includes some of the country’s largest multifamily owners and managers. In other cases, lenders like Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or housing agencies like NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development (NYCHPD) or the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA) require that borrowers, or at least those accessing green programs, benchmark their energy consumption, adding to the number of participating owners.

Bright Power's EnergyScoreCards Grading Regions

While benchmarking policies undoubtedly include some owners who have been reluctant and may do as little as possible to avoid a fine, the success of voluntary programs shows that leading multifamily owners are now doing it on their own accord; they’ve reached the conclusion that benchmarking provides real business benefits and is necessary to proactively manage their properties and stay competitive.

How Does It Work and Where Do I Start?

Utility bill-based benchmarking rarely requires any new hardware to be installed to collect consumption data, but that doesn’t mean it’s simple. While even just getting owner-paid data for a large portfolio can require collecting at least 12 months of historical data for hundreds or thousands of utility accounts, the real elephant in the room for multifamily properties is tenant data, which is needed in one form or another to assess whole building consumption and spending, usually required for compliance with local laws. Some utilities have made it easier by providing aggregate whole building data and integrating with ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, meaning owners may comply with the laws without having to manually type in utility data, or pay a service provider to retrieve and transfer it.

For other utilities, however, getting tenant data requires the laborious process of getting individual authorizations from residents and then collecting data from the utility, often extrapolating a whole building estimate from a (hopefully) representative sample. Even when working with utilities that integrate with Portfolio Manager and provide whole building data, a building owner still must set up the connection to Portfolio Manager (which often involves some amount of troubleshooting), and collect and enter property information (including square footage, units, bedrooms, information on commercial spaces, etc.). Fortunately, the EPA posts a searchable list of the utilities that offer automatic data integration, HUD has created a helpful benchmarking toolkit, and many cities with benchmarking requirements also provide a benchmarking hotline or other resources to help with compliance.

While some building owners have the time and interest to take on benchmarking DIY, most prefer to seek assistance from specialized software or service providers to collect, curate, clean and analyze the data. The good news is there are now several options for getting help, including:

  • Signing up for a multifamily benchmarking service such as Bright Power’s EnergyScoreCards service (which for full disclosure I helped create and oversee) or WegoWise.
  • Utilizing a bill aggregator or bill-pay service to transfer data to Portfolio Manager such as Ecova, AUM, NWP, Conservice; or others.
  • Using a more broadly-focused sustainability reporting services like Goby or Measurabl, which may include integration with Portfolio Manager.

If you need to or want to benchmark and you don’t want to go it alone, there are many companies now ready to assist, some of which have now been running for years, gaining in experience and capability, offering better service and value. Given a range of different offerings, getting an apples-to-apples comparison between providers is critical.

What Can I Do With Benchmarking Data?

Too many conversations about benchmarking begin and end with talking about data. Insight and action are the goals – not just data collection. No one ever saved a kWh or made a building better just by staring at numbers on a screen – no matter how quickly they arrived there or how engagingly they were presented. Translating data into insight and action can be done in dozens of ways, from peer comparisons to identifying candidates for building upgrades, to watching trends and tracking progress toward goals, to measuring the impact of specific energy and water saving projects. Unfortunately, benchmarking laws, and even some benchmarking data services, seem to trust that once building owners collect the data, getting value from it will just happen automatically.

At Bright Power, we’ve seen that while a few owners are adept at translating data into action, most need help from an expert. There are a dizzying number of possible ways to slice and dice and crunch utility data, so performing the right analysis to answer your questions, and then knowing what to do with the answers is difficult. Even simply comparing energy usage between two properties to see which is more efficient is not a simple task: Given differences in geographies, building and equipment types, ages, different metering configurations and other factors, a reasonable expectation for consumption varies from property to property. Buildings are complicated and a meaningful peer comparison is a complex and evolving field (see our recent blogs and whitepaper on the EnergyScoreCards grading model). Providing analysis and insights from data is really the driver of success for real estate companies.

Insight and action are the goals – not just data collection. No one ever saved a kWh or made a building better just by staring at numbers on a screen.

There are no one-size-fits-all answers on how to use energy and water data, but one long-term Bright Power client may spark ideas for how to use benchmarking in your own portfolio. This client, a large portfolio spanning 23 states, began benchmarking several years ago as the key to satisfy GRESB reporting requirements and show their investors they take sustainability seriously. In the last few years, our Energy Analyst and Account Management teams used property spending and consumption data from EnergyScoreCards to identify the sites with the greatest potential for energy and water savings, and target those that could benefit from specific technologies like lighting upgrades or combined heat and power.

We then overlaid project feasibility and savings potential with eligibility for utility and state incentive programs across the country, and identified sites that could receive the largest subsidies for new equipment or more detailed energy audits. Using this strategic, data-driven approach, our engineering and installation teams completed 19 energy audits and over 30 installation projects ranging from common area LED lighting retrofits, to comprehensive whole-building energy and water upgrades, to combined heat and power (CHP) installations. Where work has already been completed, we are tracking month-to-month consumption to ensure expected savings materialize, and the owner can rest assured that we are ready to troubleshoot if things don’t go as planned.

What’s Next?

In 2007, Bright Power collected data the old-fashioned way and performed a lot of our analysis using spreadsheets. There were no benchmarking disclosure laws and no national multifamily score from ENERGY STAR. There were bill processing companies but few if any who had meaningful analytics for multifamily. Multifamily benchmarking has come a long way in the last 10 years. If current trends continue, we can count on benchmarking to grow as a practice among real estate owners, and the process continuing to get easier, as more utilities provide whole building data and more service providers hone their methods for capturing, storing and analyzing the data. More owners will also successfully follow their own version of the process described above, moving beyond data collection to use the information to drive significant portfolio-wide projects to save energy and water, cut operating costs, improve resident comfort, access millions of dollars in incentives and improve the value and longevity of their properties.

The next big frontier in multifamily energy and water data may dive deeper into the data, looking at interval or “real-time” information that tracks consumption on a daily, hourly, or even 15-minute basis, allowing owners to more quickly catch problems and enabling a much deeper level of analysis than possible from monthly utility bills.

Many companies are working on devices and platforms to capture and analyze this type of data, although most remain rather expensive for the typical multifamily building. This more granular data may already make sense for applications like catching leaks, monitoring large HVAC systems, or participating in demand response programs with onsite generation technologies like CHP and batteries. Sometimes, this data is already available from new utility smart meters; in others, it will require installation of new hardware, but the costs appear to keep coming down and capabilities expanding. Really, if you’re interested in understanding how multifamily buildings use energy and water – things are just getting interesting.

 

Thanks to Apollo Engineering for featuring Jon’s article in their Summer 2017 Watts Hot Newsletter.